The Translator PDF/EPUB ↠ Paperback


The Translator Sammar, a young Muslim woman from Khartoum, has been overwhelmed with grief since her husband s death She works as an Arabic translator at a university in Aberdeen, Scotland while her son stays with her aunt in Khartoum Sammar and Rae, a kind secular Middle Eastern Studies professor, form a close friendship which deepens into love Sammar has a very strong faith that defines her as a person But Rae comes from a different religious and cultural background.Author Leila Aboulela writes using spa Sammar, a young Muslim woman from Khartoum, has been overwhelmed with grief since her husband s death She works as an Arabic translator at a university in Aberdeen, Scotland while her son stays with her aunt in Khartoum Sammar and Rae, a kind secular Middle Eastern Studies professor, form a close friendship which deepens into love Sammar has a very strong faith that defines her as a person But Rae comes from a different religious and cultural background.Author Leila Aboulela writes using spare but beautiful language Aboulela has lived in both Khartoum and Aberdeen, and gives wonderful descriptions of the contrasting locations The book starts in cold, gray Scotland in winter, reflecting the depression that Sammar is feeling She visits her family in Sudan later in the story She feels the comfort and warmth of being with her family as she s also enjoying the heat and earthy colors of Khartoum She does have to cope with the water shortages and power blackouts in Khartoum, but feels that she actslike her true self there She misses Rae, but doesn t know if they can resolve their differences The Translator is a lovely little gem about faith, traditions, love, and two very different cultures I M RE WRITING MY REVIEW.If you read the first review , then excuse my naivety.This book has been assigned for me at Uni , Although I did not have big expectations, it sure caught me off guard.The whole time I was reading this , I was having a continual feeling of d j vu as if I ve read or seen this before , not the same story obviously but the same atmosphere style.The story of a northern african making her way through Schotland , a western society , reminded me of Chimamanda Adiche s Amer I M RE WRITING MY REVIEW.If you read the first review , then excuse my naivety.This book has been assigned for me at Uni , Although I did not have big expectations, it sure caught me off guard.The whole time I was reading this , I was having a continual feeling of d j vu as if I ve read or seen this before , not the same story obviously but the same atmosphere style.The story of a northern african making her way through Schotland , a western society , reminded me of Chimamanda Adiche s Americanah , Sammar s personnality remided me of Janie from Zora Hurtson ts Her eyes were watching God and finally , the eastern western approach and the style of writing brought Elif Shafak s novels to my mind.Aside from all of that, after spending a whole day analysing the book in my head , I came to the realisation that leila portrayed faith and religion in a cheesy corny way.ABSOLUTELY HATED the fact that religion was always connectedwith marriage and even though the topics discussed are somehow important , they always end up revolving around the idea of marriage WHICH PISSED ME OFF.The ending was so frustrating so predictible.The simplicity of the language and Leila s almost poetic way of telling this story are what made it special.Highly recommend it , even though Sammar got on my nerves most of the time with her selfishness dullness Every year I notice some theme sneak into my reading This year, it s love I d rather focus on love to help me forget the hate in the world I read somewhere that Melinda Gates chooses a word each year for her resolution of sorts, so there it is, my reading resolution The love story drew me to this novel but the mood kept me enthralled This is Leila Aboulela s first novel and atmospherically, it is distinct She thought that it was not true what people said, that time passed quickly when Every year I notice some theme sneak into my reading This year, it s love I d rather focus on love to help me forget the hate in the world I read somewhere that Melinda Gates chooses a word each year for her resolution of sorts, so there it is, my reading resolution The love story drew me to this novel but the mood kept me enthralled This is Leila Aboulela s first novel and atmospherically, it is distinct She thought that it was not true what people said, that time passed quickly when you were happy and passed slowly when you were sad For on her darkest days after Tarig died, grief had burned away time, devoured the hours effortlessly, the days in chunk after chunk Now every day stretched long and when Rae spoke to her a few words, when they only saw each other for a few minutes, these minutes expanded and these words multiplied and filled up time with what she wanted to take with her, what she did not want to leave behind With this New York Times Notable Book, I traversed Aberdeen, Scotland and Khartoum, Sudan with a woman grieving the loss of her husband With admirable restraint and lucidity, the third person narrative becomes so close that her vulnerability is laid bare A Sudanese mother who cannot hold her child, cannot wake up or walk up the stairs without effort, cannot return to her homeland She is depressed, angry, helpless, broken What sustains her is her work as an Arabic translator at a university She works for an Islamic scholar who listens to her, asks for her opinions, makes her feel visible again in a world where she feels isolated, a woman of a different culture and religion She starts to look forward to her days at the university, looks forward to the end of the day when the professor emerges from the lecture hall and they can talk about works needing translation, talk about religion like scholars A mesh of faith and love, this novel is an experimentation of love at the intersection of culture and religion, a notable journey across continents This is undoubtedly one of the best books I ve had the opportunity to read The characters make your heart soar, the dialogues, images, themes are all profoundly moving I have not had such an emotional response to a piece of fiction in a long time I learned many things from this book I remembered prayer, I thought of loss, and love and the pervasive nature of love that allows you to conquer fear and stigma I learned about the beauty of the human spirit to persevere, to hold onto love despite This is undoubtedly one of the best books I ve had the opportunity to read The characters make your heart soar, the dialogues, images, themes are all profoundly moving I have not had such an emotional response to a piece of fiction in a long time I learned many things from this book I remembered prayer, I thought of loss, and love and the pervasive nature of love that allows you to conquer fear and stigma I learned about the beauty of the human spirit to persevere, to hold onto love despite shifts in space, and time I felt this was an intensely spiritual book as well, because the the main character Sammar possessed a quiet piety, respect, and compassion It was deeply moving for me when she realized her mistake of placing herself first in this matter of love, as if she could decide the contents of another s heart, as if she could demand their love This book made me think about how friendship and love are so difficult to distinguish, how easily they come in phone calls, conversations, and exchanges When I finished this book on my NJ Transit ride to work, I wanted to immediately buy millions of copies of this book to distribute to my fellow passengers I wanted so much to share this story with everyone I knew If you are a believer on any level of hope, change, love, Islam I think this is a significant piece for you to read When the viewpoint seems so rare, it makes you realize just how rare it is to have a muslim woman tell her own story and express her feelings in fiction But it s not to be read just for it s particular point of view it is also a beautiful story of being and loving and being alien in your own culture as well as the one you re living in The contrasts and the sameness, the love and loss that goes with human migration You should definitely read Aboulela, and not just for the diversity The story of oddly enough a translator This is about a Sudanese widow who has embraced her Islamic religion She is living in Scotland when she start working as an Arabic translator for an Islamic scholar who is not a believer After they fall in love she must decide what is stronger, her love or her faith What this novel explores with great finesse is the true nature of faith What it means to be faithful and what it means to give your life over to that The language in this novel is a joy The story of oddly enough a translator This is about a Sudanese widow who has embraced her Islamic religion She is living in Scotland when she start working as an Arabic translator for an Islamic scholar who is not a believer After they fall in love she must decide what is stronger, her love or her faith What this novel explores with great finesse is the true nature of faith What it means to be faithful and what it means to give your life over to that The language in this novel is a joy to read and the story is lovely Highly enjoyable and different look at the Islamic faith American readers were introduced to the award winning Sudanese author Leila Aboulela with Minaret, a delicate tale of a privileged young African Muslim woman adjusting to her new life as a maid in London Now, for the first time in North America, we step back to her extraordinarily assured debut about a widowed Muslim mother living in Aberdeen who falls in love with a Scottish secular academic Sammar is a Sudanese widow working as an Arabic translator at a Scottish university Since the sudden death of her husband, her young son has gone to live with family in Khartoum, leaving Sammar alone in cold, gray Aberdeen, grieving and isolated But when she begins to translate for Rae, a Scottish Islamic scholar, the two develop a deep friendship that awakens in Sammar all the longing for life she has repressed As Rae and Sammar fall in love, she knows they will have to address his lack of faith in all that Sammar holds sacred An exquisitely crafted meditation on love, both human and divine, The Translator is ultimately the story of one woman s courage to stay true to her beliefs, herself, and her newfound love ❰PDF / Epub❯ ☉ El precio del Trono Author Pilar Urbano – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk a delicate tale of a privileged young African Muslim woman adjusting to her new life as a maid in London Now ☃ The Taking of Annie Thorne PDF / Epub ✑ Author C.J. Tudor – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk for the first time in North America ➽ [Reading] ➿ Exhalation By Ted Chiang ➲ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk we step back to her extraordinarily assured debut about a widowed Muslim mother living in Aberdeen who falls in love with a Scottish secular academic Sammar is a Sudanese widow working as an Arabic translator at a Scottish university Since the sudden death of her husband [Ebook] ➥ L.A. Bondage ➫ Dave Naz – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk her young son has gone to live with family in Khartoum ❮Download❯ ➽ Agosto Interminable Author Gabriela Rosas – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk leaving Sammar alone in cold ❰Read❯ ➮ A Really Good Day Author Ayelet Waldman – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk gray Aberdeen [Epub] ➛ Lecciones de alcoba Por Melanie Rogers – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk grieving and isolated But when she begins to translate for Rae [Descargar] ➹ Fantasmas de hielo: La épica búsqueda de la expedición Franklin (ODISEAS) Por Paul Watson – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk a Scottish Islamic scholar [Ebook] ➨ The Book of Lost and Found By Lucy Foley – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk the two develop a deep friendship that awakens in Sammar all the longing for life she has repressed As Rae and Sammar fall in love [EPUB] ✹ Mr. Malcolms List By Suzanne Allain – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk she knows they will have to address his lack of faith in all that Sammar holds sacred An exquisitely crafted meditation on love ❃ Green Planet (Dominoes: Level 2) kindle Epub ❧ Author Christine Lindop – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk both human and divine [Download] ➻ Dark Age (Red Rising Saga, By Pierce Brown – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk The Translator is ultimately the story of one woman s courage to stay true to her beliefs ✻ [EPUB] ✰ Las princesas van a la universidad (PLAN B) Por Brioche Brioche ❅ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk herself [Reading] ➿ 36 Questions That Changed My Mind About You By Vicki Grant – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk and her newfound love The Translator is about Sammar, a Muslim widow, who moves to Scotland with her husband before he dies in a car accident Its a moving and accurate tale about a demographic that is inexplicable to most Westerners the Muslim woman The tale starts with Sammar translating a document sent by a terrorist group She notes how rife with spelling mistakes it is, how pathetic and instantly creates a barrier between Muslims like her, and uneducated extremists like them, fighting against a force they don The Translator is about Sammar, a Muslim widow, who moves to Scotland with her husband before he dies in a car accident Its a moving and accurate tale about a demographic that is inexplicable to most Westerners the Muslim woman The tale starts with Sammar translating a document sent by a terrorist group She notes how rife with spelling mistakes it is, how pathetic and instantly creates a barrier between Muslims like her, and uneducated extremists like them, fighting against a force they don t even understand, while she stands firm in her beliefs in a country that has no patience for them But most Westerners don t see the difference, we equate the two because Sammar s belief is inexplicable to us But the book slowly changes that, we begin to understand what she is feeling because of Aboulela s poetry We feel the grey Scottish fog press all around us, we feel the grey saturation, the cold, the isolation and loneliness inherent in Western society, and finally we feel the respite she gets from praying five times a day, and from studying the Quran There are faults in every culture, though we can seldom see the ones in ours But through Sammar s eyes we begin to see our impatience, detachment, consumerism and lack of family Sammar s name is the word for evening conversations or night talk where the whole family would gather and spend time together watching the sky before sleeping This concept has all but disappeared in our busy lives where we don t even make time to have dinner together But as Sammar is surprised to discover, because of the pollution and increase of Western ideas of consumerism, it is disappearing from the East as well Sammar s perspective gives us pause to consider weather our ideas are really the right ones Her love story with Rae gives us a chance to connect to her Her desire to be loved, her fear of rejection, the harsh words that pour out of her when she feels rejected, and finally the humbling realization of her selfishness Her struggle to achieve happiness while staying true to her beliefs shows the depth of her belief in a way that is tangible to our secular society I was both absorbed by and ambivalent about this book which is an oddity, because I wouldn t have thought it was possible to be both at once But here I am absorbed and ambivalent having wanted very much to see where the story would go, and yet not really finding Aboulela s writing particularly compelling The Translator focuses on the life of Summar, a young, Sudanese widow in Aberdeen, who translates Arabic texts for a department at the local university There she meets Rae, an Islamic sc I was both absorbed by and ambivalent about this book which is an oddity, because I wouldn t have thought it was possible to be both at once But here I am absorbed and ambivalent having wanted very much to see where the story would go, and yet not really finding Aboulela s writing particularly compelling The Translator focuses on the life of Summar, a young, Sudanese widow in Aberdeen, who translates Arabic texts for a department at the local university There she meets Rae, an Islamic scholar, and they fall in love which is, of course, only the beginning of everything.It sounds like a trite premise, but there s nothing trite about the telling the obstacles Summar, in particular, faces as she tries to understand this new relationship are particular and moving the power her first husband s mother has over her, the longing for home, a son in another country, her heartfelt faith Yet the prose here is so stilted, so blockish and precise that much of what I wanted to get from Summar s story never came no particularly deep sense of empathy or understanding, no real honest sense of her emotional landscape I began to wonder, in the end, if the prose didn t match Summar s character but that seems unfair, since when Summar is disconnected and displaced, she s sad and grieving, not acting on any particular character impulse Does the prose match the clumsiness of English to someone who s used to speaking the grace of Arabic I m not sure.I never think the word interesting really conveys very much, but this book was, definitely, interesting I m glad I read it, and I feel like I briefly saw the world through very different eyes but I wasn t captivated in the way I have been with other literature This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Girl meets boy, girl falls in love with boy but cannot be with him because their religions are different Girl scolds boy and runs away, far, far away and prays boy will convert so they can be together Boy converts and travels the many miles to find girl, and they marry and live happily ever after.Might have been written by the brothers Grimm in the 18 19th C had they lived a few thousand miles away.In addition the feminist protagonist, who I admit might be feminist given her circumstances, b Girl meets boy, girl falls in love with boy but cannot be with him because their religions are different Girl scolds boy and runs away, far, far away and prays boy will convert so they can be together Boy converts and travels the many miles to find girl, and they marry and live happily ever after.Might have been written by the brothers Grimm in the 18 19th C had they lived a few thousand miles away.In addition the feminist protagonist, who I admit might be feminist given her circumstances, blames the man entirely for the impediments in the relationship, acts impulsively like a teenager when he is unwilling to make a considerable sacrifice for her, but then yields and lowers her head before her mother in law.Other than that the first part is really good, the alienation, the rich characterisation of Rae, and the equally rich and romantic descriptions of the environments another nod the Romantic tradition It s a pity that from the ending of part one it becomes such a household fable


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About the Author: Leila Aboulela

Leila Aboulela grew up in Khartoum, Sudan where she attended the Khartoum American School and Sister School She graduated from Khartoum University in 1985 with a degree in Economics and was awarded her Masters degree in statistics from the London School of Economics She lived for many years in Aberdeen where she wrote most of her works while looking after her family she currently lives and lectures in Abu Dhabi.She was awarded the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2000 for her short story The Museum and her novel The Translator was nominated for the Orange Prize in 2002, and was chosen as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times in 2006.