Waterline MOBI ↠ Paperback

Waterline At times bleak and despairing a novel about grief,depression,families and friends.Set initially in working class Glasgow the scene then shifts South to London where we encounter the world of the homeless.Parts of this section were laboured and repetitive I found.This novel is well written,permeated with humour and phrased in vernacular of Glasgow.Four stars. From BBC radio 4 Book at Bedtime Waterline is Ross Raisin s long awaited new novel after the success of his prize winning debut God s Own Country The sun is on his face, and he spots the postie turning in through the gate He is awake, that s obvious enough, but he has this sense of unrealness That it s him that s not real That s aye what it feels like As if all these goings on around him the sunshine, the television still quietly on, the post tummelling onto the mat they are all From BBC radio 4 Book at Bedtime Waterline is Ross Raisin s long awaited new novel after the success of his prize winning debut God s Own Country The sun is on his face, and he spots the postie turning in through the gate He is awake, that s obvious enough, but he has this sense of unrealness That it s him that s not real That s aye what it feels like As if all these goings on around him the sunshine, the television still quietly on, the post tummelling onto the mat they are all part of some other life, one that he can see, but he s no a part of After the death of his beloved wife Cathy, ex Glasgow shipbuilder and union man, Mick Little, finds himself struggling The shipyard s gone and with it his old way of life, and now his wife too With the ties that bound him to his past suddenly loosened, he finds himself adrift Starting out again, away from Scotland, he can leave somethings behind but not the guilt he feels over Cathy s death.Tracing Mick s journey from his old life in Glasgow to the harsh, alien world of a hotel kitchen, and on to the rough streets of London, this is an intensely moving portrait of a life in the balance, and a story for our times.Episode 1 of 10Today Cathy s funeral brings old family tensions to the surface, as Mick struggles to come to terms with his wife s untimely death.Episode 2 of 10Today alone now after his in laws and sons have returned home, Mick sets about getting back to normality But nothing is normal now.Episode 3 of 10Today Mick finds that his home holds too many painful memories and is haunted by the part he might have played in Cathy s deathEpisode 4 of 10Today deciding that the only way to survive is to leave the past behind, Mick sets out for London.Episode 5 of 10Today Mick s new life down in London begins with a gruelling job in the bleak surroundings of a London airport.Episode 6 of 10Today now moneyless and jobless, Mick finds himself trying to negotiate life on the harsh streets of London.Episode 7 of 10Today still struggling to stay afloat on the streets of London, Mick finds shelter, and an unlikely ally.Episode 8 of 10Today Mick and his ally Beans have carved out a form of existence on the riverbanks of London, when a horrific attack shocks Mick into actionEpisode 9 of 10Today as Mick starts to rebuild his life in London, painful news from Glasgow forces him to confront his past.Episode 10 of 10Today Finally off the streets now, Mick determines to face up to the past But can there ever be a future for him and his two sons God s Own Country was nominated for eight major awards, winning the Betty Trask and the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year awards.Reader Alexander MortonAbridger Sally MarmionProducer Justine Willett.https www.bbc.co.uk programmes b012 And see if he did put a claim in then the reminders would be there the whole time for months, years, however long it took and even that is still ignoring the main thing why should he get a windfall Him that brought it into the house and handed her the overalls to wash and here s two hundred grand, pal, take it, it s yours you deserve it After the death of his wife to mesothelioma, Mick has to start his life over, struggling with the guilt from her death attributable to residue from his job i And see if he did put a claim in then the reminders would be there the whole time for months, years, however long it took and even that is still ignoring the main thing why should he get a windfall Him that brought it into the house and handed her the overalls to wash and here s two hundred grand, pal, take it, it s yours you deserve it After the death of his wife to mesothelioma, Mick has to start his life over, struggling with the guilt from her death attributable to residue from his job in the shipyards While his children hint at getting a settlement, to punish the company that virtually saturated their employees in asbestos, Mick resists any idea of what he imagines a payoff for her death While the story proceeds with his descent into grief, it never plays into the stereotype of the grieving widower who travels through five stages of grief to recover and find love again with a sweet old lady down the street Instead, his journey is literal Unable, emotionally, to reside in the house any, he starts sleeping in a shed outside, and his focus changes to minor things to avoid thinking about the bigger issues He begins finding a kinshipwith the birds he feeds than with other humans He listens, enjoying the sound of it, as they begin skittering on the concrete outside the shed doorUntil recently there d been just the one probably the same patient guy that s been coming all the while but he s obvious gone and let dab to all his mates that they can come and eat here, and now there s a whole mob of them Good for him, no keeping it all to himself Obviously no an English bird A genuine Southsider, that sparrow The quote above reveals a wry humor that Mick has, told in his warm Glasgow accent It s revealed again as he s run out of money, and thinks about the possibility of asking his brother in law for money he d be pure delighted, guaranteed A great song and dance over it, the ceremonious fetching of the chequebook, the smug showy putting on of the wee reading glasses How much would you like, Mick Really, it s not a problem How much Instead of resorting to that indignation, Mick chooses another option complete departure, from both Glasgow and reality He ends up in London living a life he d never imagined, and one that he hopes to hide from his sons left behind, who know nothing of his location.Mick s voice is full of irony and desperate humor, especially when he remarks on the cheap condolences friends make when they see him He s a realist that knows far too well how little people really feel about his loss In this many vivid side characters are pulled in, and while they don t appear long, they are memorable for the way they are described Midway through the novel I glanced at the author s photograph in the back It stopped me in my tracks It s a young guy that wrote this aged voice It sort of put me off, for a day anyway, because I couldn t imagine how a young man anyone younger than me qualifies in that regard could create such a complex persona that melds humor, regret, guilt, and anxiety in one realistic character Topping it off is the Scottish voice that Mick delivers his thoughts in sometimes an accent is hard to read because it doesn t flow, but in this case it was much of the charm Would make a killer audiobook Especially noteworthy is that while it is essentially a quest motif, the fact that neither the reader nor the protagonist knows the object that is being sought makes it mysterious The pace speeds up as you literally follow Mick through a labyrinth of people and places, and you really don t know where he s headed And the questions continue to plague you what happened to his sons Who were the men at the door Will he go back to Glasgow What was up with Craig This is on target for my top five titles of 2011 Not only because of the main character and the plot, but also because of what it reveals about those living outside the margins of society While the underbelly of large cities is often presented as a place of crime and prostitution, Waterline exposes the remote lives of immigrants and the homeless, attempting to live an honorable life while no one wants to meet their eyes Ross Raisin does a fine line in dark and deep His first novel was shortlisted for nine literary awards and I d go so far as to say this will follow.It details the downward spiral of Mick after his wife dies from methothelioma a condition he blames himself for from his time working on the shipyards, bringing the dust back home We meet Mick and his family at the funeral Craig, his taciturn son who says little to his father and feels a lot for his dead mother and Robbie, the younger son who no Ross Raisin does a fine line in dark and deep His first novel was shortlisted for nine literary awards and I d go so far as to say this will follow.It details the downward spiral of Mick after his wife dies from methothelioma a condition he blames himself for from his time working on the shipyards, bringing the dust back home We meet Mick and his family at the funeral Craig, his taciturn son who says little to his father and feels a lot for his dead mother and Robbie, the younger son who now lives in Australia and reluctantly leaves his father to his new widower life.With the guilt of his wfe s death pressing down on him and no way to find a lead into this new life that he doesn t want old friends and colleagues think to leave him to himself is helping him, he can t get his old job back and money is running out Mick withdraws from life as he knew it and eventually heads for London.From a job as a kitchen porter to prowling the streets of London looking for a dry place to sleep we follow Mick as his grief and guilt for his wife take a good hold that never dissipates.A harrowing but truthful account of sadly, an all too famiiar tale of these times Ross depicts a picture that shows clearly how any decent, hard working person can become a victim of the times and end up in this situation He never prettifies this picture, it is dark and gloomy and it s hard to get out of the horrific facts are drawn out with no drama or build up, it is how it is and that makes the impact resonatethoroughly.Mick is a Glaswegian, no nonsense fella, he s a working man and proud his voice comes across as such, never feeling sorry for himself, living life one day to the next but the guilt over his wife never assauges He comes across as a likeable man, sunk deep into depression but never bitter He comes to rely on Beans and the partnership of the two men adds a little ironic warmth to the story although it also intensifies the grimness of it too.After reading this I defy anyone to look at down and out people the same way It s quite heart rending to know that so many people are out there in this situation and are looked down upon when in actuality they are humans that have had a rough time and need a little compassion from those that have No one knows their story and assumptions are easy to make.The whole story, from the asbestos cover up in the shipyards, to the shipyards closing, but always working at whatever comes along, to the death from the asbestos is the story of many people showing how politics and greed affect lives and Ross has taken it that one step further where most imaginations won t go and shown us how much farther that story can and does go.Fabulous prose that really gets into Mick s head and eats away at the readers conscience.Don t expect a happy ending, by now, we now that s not what Ross Raisin deals with but do expect to be stunned by the detail and grimness thereof You ll come away from this book feeling a little dirty, probably relieved and most likely a bit guilty but you will keep thinking about it This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Book at bedtime Ross Raisin s long awaited new novel after the success of his prize winning debut God s Own Country The sun is on his face, and he spots the postie turning in through the gate He is awake, that s obvious enough, but he has this sense of unrealness That it s him that s not real That s aye what it feels like As if all these goings on around him the sunshine, the television still quietly on, the post tummelling onto the mat they are all part of some other life, one tha Book at bedtime Ross Raisin s long awaited new novel after the success of his prize winning debut God s Own Country The sun is on his face, and he spots the postie turning in through the gate He is awake, that s obvious enough, but he has this sense of unrealness That it s him that s not real That s aye what it feels like As if all these goings on around him the sunshine, the television still quietly on, the post tummelling onto the mat they are all part of some other life, one that he can see, but he s no a part of After the death of his beloved wife Cathy, ex Glasgow shipbuilder and union man, Mick Little finds himself struggling The shipyard s gone and with it his old way of life, and now his wife too With the ties that bound him to his old life suddenly loosened, he sets about finding a new way to live Tracing Mick s journey from his old life in Glasgow to the harsh, alien world of a hotel kitchen, to the rough streets of London, this is an intensely moving portrait of a life being lived all around us, and a story for our times.Today Mick s new life down in London begins with a gruelling job in the bleak surroundings of a London airport God s Own Country was nominated for eight major awards, winning the Betty Trask and the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year awards.Reader Alexander MortonAbridger Sally MarmionProducer Justine Willett Following the descent of a recently widowed man into homelessness, Waterline is my read of the year so far The grief and terror Raisin depicts as Mick attempts to process the death of his wife and manage his new life on the streets is truly moving Much like God s Own Country this novel focuses on themes of isolation and withdrawal, or rejection, from society The narrative switches from Mick s voice to outsiders, such as the reader, who encounter the homeless on a daily basis but keep their ey Following the descent of a recently widowed man into homelessness, Waterline is my read of the year so far The grief and terror Raisin depicts as Mick attempts to process the death of his wife and manage his new life on the streets is truly moving Much like God s Own Country this novel focuses on themes of isolation and withdrawal, or rejection, from society The narrative switches from Mick s voice to outsiders, such as the reader, who encounter the homeless on a daily basis but keep their eyes to the ground In many ways the narrative structure feels like a telling off a reminder that the homeless haven t always been homeless The outside judgements are interspersed with Mick s mundane but touching flashbacks of his old life, his wife chopping vegetables or sifting through clothing rails The sense of despair is countered somewhat by Raisin s positive description of the support offered by homeless and religious organisations the hallelujahs and charities Providing basic care is one means of support the charities offer but importantly they also serve to bring the isolated individuals together The friendships, albeit fleeting, Mick makes whilst working at the hotel and with fellow homeless man Beans, are one of the most successful elements of the novel As in God s Own Country, Raisin s handling of dialect is masterful and gives the novel a great deal of momentum The Glaswegian vernacular is engaging and his use of colloqulliasms against the London setting adds a powerful emotive element to the story Waterline forces the reader to recognize the voice of the very people they pretend to neither hear nor see everyday got a good review at the weekend from various papers and I really liked his first novel God s Own Country.I am tempted to give it 5 stars because it ended up a moving account of one man s descent into poverty and homelessness after the shock of his wife s death He is an ex Clydebank shipbuilder, and feels guilty because he has caused her death through the asbestos he brought home on in his clothes Unable to cope with the grief anf guilt and too proud to go on the dole on the broo or to cla got a good review at the weekend from various papers and I really liked his first novel God s Own Country.I am tempted to give it 5 stars because it ended up a moving account of one man s descent into poverty and homelessness after the shock of his wife s death He is an ex Clydebank shipbuilder, and feels guilty because he has caused her death through the asbestos he brought home on in his clothes Unable to cope with the grief anf guilt and too proud to go on the dole on the broo or to claim compensation he runs off to London where he works in a hotel with immigrant workers Losing that job he becomes homeless, drinking superlager and eventually begging at atube station before getting a place in a hostel It has none of the exuberance, humour or punch of God s Own Country, instead it is a somber and detailed description of decline, a very different read Although his book is partly set in Scotland and his protagonist Scottish I think with Raisin, McGregor, and Cartwright we are seeing a wave of English writers tackling working class problems in the way that Scottish writers Kelman, Welsh, Warner have been doing for some time Long may it continue really great novel about family man who loses his wife, his job, his sons loves, his respect and selfworth, then goes to the streets and lives rough and nobody knows where he went his family finally tracks him down and he screws up the courage to meet his sons again, or so we suppose the ending is a bit ambiguous in only that we know someone died, alone but then, don t we all brilliant pacing, controlled descriptions of uncontrolled decent into illegitimacy story itself reminds me of izzo s really great novel about family man who loses his wife, his job, his sons loves, his respect and selfworth, then goes to the streets and lives rough and nobody knows where he went his family finally tracks him down and he screws up the courage to meet his sons again, or so we suppose the ending is a bit ambiguous in only that we know someone died, alone but then, don t we all brilliant pacing, controlled descriptions of uncontrolled decent into illegitimacy story itself reminds me of izzo s A Sun For The Dying but raisin writes to me like ondaatje The Cat s Table coetzee Summertime banville Ancient Light while so far anyway, really really addressing marginal and poor folks, farmers, drunks, fuckups, ship builders, social workers,i hope ross raisin can hang in there as i would love to read his best novel of the year soon Mick Little used to be a shipbuilder in the Glasgow docks He returned from Australiayears ago with his beloved wife Cathy, who longed to be back home But now Cathy s dead and it s probably his fault Soon Mick will have to find a new way to live get a new job, get away, start again, forget everything ✫ Fisica 1 - Principios y Problemas Books ✭ Author Paul W. Zitzewitz – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk who longed to be back home But now Cathy s dead and it s probably his fault Soon Mick will have to find a new way to live get a new job [BOOKS] ✬ The Beautiful Disruption By G.G. Renee Hill – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk get away ➸ [Read] ➳ Games Rednecks Play By Jeff Foxworthy ➽ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk start again [PDF / Epub] ☁ The Magic Cottage By James Herbert – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk forget everything I had to read this for my book club Please don t ask me to read it again, ever I was the only person at the group who did not rave about it s realism, and how it changed their view of guilt because his asbestos covered clothes gave his wife cancer , depressed due to being widowed and homelessness because he lost the plot of who cared about him and would have supported him in his guilt grief if only he had TOLD THEM.The best section was how social workers tried to connect with him, and h I had to read this for my book club Please don t ask me to read it again, ever I was the only person at the group who did not rave about it s realism, and how it changed their view of guilt because his asbestos covered clothes gave his wife cancer , depressed due to being widowed and homelessness because he lost the plot of who cared about him and would have supported him in his guilt grief if only he had TOLD THEM.The best section was how social workers tried to connect with him, and help The funniest bits involved his weird friend among the homeless in London, good old Beans


About the Author: Ross Raisin

Ross Raisin is a British novelist He was born in Keighley in Yorkshire, and after attending Bradford Grammar School he studied English at King s College London, which was followed by a period as a trainee wine bar manager and a postgraduate degree in creative writing at Goldsmiths, University of London.Raisin s debut novel God s Own Country titled Out Backward in North America was published in 2008 It was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award and the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize, and won a Betty Trask Award The novel focuses on Sam Marsdyke, a disturbed adolescent living in a harsh rural environment, and follows his journey from isolated oddity to outright insanity Thomas Meaney in The Washington Post compared the novel favorably to Anthony Burgess s A Clockwork Orange, and said Out Backwardconvincingly registers the internal logic of unredeemable delinquency Writing in The Guardian Justine Jordan described the novel as an absorbing read , which marked Raisin out as a young writer to watch In April 2009 the book won Raisin the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award He is currently a writer in residence for the charity First Story.In 2013 he was included in the Granta list of 20 best young writers.Raisin has worked as a waiter, dishwasher and barman.


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