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Count Zero A corporate mercenary wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him, for a mission dangerous than the one he’s recovering from: to get a defecting chief of Ramp;D—and the biochip he’s perfected—out intact But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties—some of whom aren’t remotely human ➠ [Epub] ➚ Longbow Girl By Linda Davies ➪ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk a beautiful woman by his side Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him [Read] ➲ On His Naughty List By Jessica Jarman – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk for a mission dangerous than the one he’s recovering from: to get a defecting chief of Ramp;D—and the biochip he’s perfected—out intact But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties—some of whom aren’t remotely human


About the Author: William Gibson

See this thread for information.William Ford Gibson is an American Canadian writer who has been called the father of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction, having coined the term cyberspace in 1982 and popularized it in his first novel, Neuromancer(1984), which has sold than 6.5 million copies worldwide.While his early writing took the form of short stories, Gibson has since written nine critically acclaimed novels (one in collaboration), contributed articles to several major publications, and has collaborated extensively with performance artists, filmmakers and musicians His thought has been cited as an influence on science fiction authors, academia, cyberculture, and technology William Gibson (2007, October 17) In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia Retrieved 20:30, October 19, 2007, from



10 thoughts on “Count Zero

  1. says:

    The coolest thing about reading Gibson is jacking in to his urbane and hip way of descriptive narration.

    William Gibson, as prophet of cyber punk and also as the herald of his later Blue Ant works, returns to The Sprawl for a continuation of the setting he began in his masterwork, Neuromancer.

    But like many of his books, this sequel is only that in r


  2. says:

    “it involved the idea that people who were genuinely dangerous might not need to exhibit the fact at all, and that the ability to conceal a threat made them even more dangerous.”
    ― William Gibson, Count Zero

    description

    I haven't read Sprawl # 3 (


  3. says:

    I would perhaps complain that the ending was a bit to deus ex machina for my taste, but then the entire book is wound around the theme of god being in the machine. From the vodou loa who seemingly possess various characters and steer the entire plot; to the mad European trillionare who has reached near immortality through preservation vats and virtual reality; to the insane former net cowboy who now believes he has found god in the random yet deeply moving works of art created by long abandoned industrial robot; eve


  4. says:


    Following the resounding success of my Locus Quest, I faced a dilemma: which reading list to follow it up with? Variety is the spice of life, so I’ve decided to diversify and pursue six different lists simultaneously. This book falls int


  5. says:

    This is a sequel to Neuromancer. I use the term loosely.

    There's really 3 stories here that all tie together at the end.

    Marly, an art specialist, her world wracked by scandal, is a approached by an incredibly rich man and offered obscene amounts of money to track the origins of some art pieces he's interested in. But what has she really gotten herself into?

    Turner is a badass mercenary who does his job ruthlessly and efficiently. Now he's been hired by a man named Mitchell. But when it all goes s


  6. says:

    When I was maybe halfway through this book, I wrote this elsewhere:

    --------------------

    It’s funny reading “classic” William Gibson now because he basically imagined a version of the internet that was much less life-changing than the actual internet.

    There will be instant electronic full VR communication but there will be no communities or subcultures in it, people will still just be friends in real life and then talk on the (video) phone sometimes. Using the internet is sort of like playing a vid


  7. says:

    ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature.

    They plot with men, my other selves, and men imagine they are gods.

    Several years have passed since Molly and Case freed the AI who calls himself Neuromancer. Neuromancer’s been busy and now his plots have widened to involve several people whom we meet in Count Zero:

    Turner is a recently reconstructed mercenary who’s been hired by the Hosaka Corporation to extract Christopher Mitchell and his daughter Angie fr


  8. says:

    A Modish Synopsis, A Modest Assemblage, A Little Looksee

    It's a whole long story, and it's open to interpretation. Each chapter begins with a pronoun, or two. And then it's off like a robber's dog. I decided you and I might hit the matrix for a little looksee. You followed, forgetting your fears, forgetting the nausea and constant vertigo. You were there, and you understood this was our space, our construct. It came on, a flickering, non-linear flood of fact and sensory data, a kind of narrative conveyed in surreal jumpcuts and juxtapositions.


  9. says:

    An interesting addition to the Sprawl trilogy started with Neuromancer, taking a look at similar themes from a different perspective. What makes us human? What effect is technology having on us as a species? What happens if technology develops beyond our understanding and of its own free will?

    I wasn't blown away, in fact I found it quite difficult to read at times yet managed to read it what felt like no time at all. This sort of sums up the contradiction of my experience of this book. Bored yet unable to stop reading. Putting the book down ever


  10. says:

    Barely made it to 3*s...
    Parts of the book were good and made me want to keep reading, but then invariably the chapter changed and we went back to people whose story I wasn't interested in.
    And in the end it just kinda all fizzles out... If it's going to do that I at least want it to make me think, like a Philip K Dick book, but this one almost just left me thinking that I was glad it was over because I can forget about it.


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