Kingdom of Ten Thousand Things: An Impossible Journey from

Kingdom of Ten Thousand Things: An Impossible Journey from Kabul to Chiapas I think it was an interesting book, but some parts were a bit too much TMI He came across as a randy old goat for some of it and I feel that him putting words into the monk Huisien s mouth, especially the randy old goat parts, was unnecessary, uncalled for and was not respectful to the memory of the monk.The historical parts and his descriptions of the places he traveled to were interesting and I wish he had focused on thatDespite all of his research into the past, he didn t seem to both I think it was an interesting book, but some parts were a bit too much TMI He came across as a randy old goat for some of it and I feel that him putting words into the monk Huisien s mouth, especially the randy old goat parts, was unnecessary, uncalled for and was not respectful to the memory of the monk.The historical parts and his descriptions of the places he traveled to were interesting and I wish he had focused on thatDespite all of his research into the past, he didn t seem to bother to research the local holidays of the places to which he was traveling and he ended up missingmuseums and places of historical interest due to poor planning then bureaucratic red tape Which was a shame I also feel that the use of the word impossible in the sub title of the book is hyperbole, as both the monk 3,000 years ago and the author made the journey Maybe it was used to highlight that the journey is not impossible and that there was transatlantic travel between Asia and the Americas, but I think that would be stretching interpretation of the subtitle Final word, okay book I wouldn t recommend it, but it wasn t horrible found this on the sale table at B and N and hope it turns out to be as good as it looks These kinds of half way around the world journeys make you feel like there s a whole world out there that hasn t been discovered or mapped yet I hope it s as good as it looks. How can anyone travelling through so many fascinating, stimulating places produce such a dreary read I purchased it having read the blurb from the Vancouver Sun that the Author joins the ranks of the great travel writers like Bruce Chatwin What a load of cobblers There is no subtle touch of humanity here with his interactions with others and he is totally lacking in self awareness Nor, as other commentators see below have commented the slightest ability to organise proper clothing, get How can anyone travelling through so many fascinating, stimulating places produce such a dreary read I purchased it having read the blurb from the Vancouver Sun that the Author joins the ranks of the great travel writers like Bruce Chatwin What a load of cobblers There is no subtle touch of humanity here with his interactions with others and he is totally lacking in self awareness Nor, as other commentators see below have commented the slightest ability to organise proper clothing, get the opening times for museums right or have any sense of cultural awareness whatsoever, his interaction with a Mexican lady at the end of the book typical of his weird judgemental obsessions The writer comes across as a self obsessed, self indulgent wealthy white West coaster who leaves a trail of disgusted indigenous peoples behind him Avoid this and purchase Paul Theroux s Riding the Iron Rooster instead, believe me you ll thank me for it Stepping off the ship in Vancouver, I had been suddenly overcome by the impossibility of my projectI had reached a point at which I doubted I would ever write the book he and his legend hinted at p.315I could have told the author this after 50 pages to pick a random number This author appears to have benefited from a very indulgent publisher The entire tract consists of hints as to what is fully explained in other books by other authors their works are cited and trivia about the Stepping off the ship in Vancouver, I had been suddenly overcome by the impossibility of my projectI had reached a point at which I doubted I would ever write the book he and his legend hinted at p.315I could have told the author this after 50 pages to pick a random number This author appears to have benefited from a very indulgent publisher The entire tract consists of hints as to what is fully explained in other books by other authors their works are cited and trivia about the author s too small boots, love of steamed broccoli, and the Chinese equivalent of an Oreo cookie which was the snack on an in country flight there are occasional attempts to wax poetic or get philosophical none of high quality We know noabout the possibility that a Buddhist monk visited the Americas pre Columbus after this reading this book than we got from the first explanation that this is the reason the author is undertaking his journey at the very beginning of the book The search for evidence of Chinese travel to North America long before Columbus. It took me awhile to finish this tome However, I found it a worthwhile read It was interesting to hear about the author s travels in Afghanistan and China I feel like the monk research stuff was a lil chunky, but I still found it to be of interest Who knows, right It could ve happened, anything is possible The world is wide and all that Happy reading. Initially, I thought this book was a fictionalized version of a legend about a Buddhist monk traveling from Afghanistan to America centuries before the birth of Jesus However, it ended up being a travelogue, with the author tracing the route of the monk in search of any evidence that points to the truth of the legend.Starting in Afghanistan just before 9 11, the author travels through Pakistan and into China from China, he takes passage aboard a freighter to simulate the monk s named Huishen Initially, I thought this book was a fictionalized version of a legend about a Buddhist monk traveling from Afghanistan to America centuries before the birth of Jesus However, it ended up being a travelogue, with the author tracing the route of the monk in search of any evidence that points to the truth of the legend.Starting in Afghanistan just before 9 11, the author travels through Pakistan and into China from China, he takes passage aboard a freighter to simulate the monk s named Huishen possible voyage across the sea Finally, he travels throughout Mexico and Central America, looking for signs of Huishen s voyage and possible Asian Buddhist influence in the old cultures of Mesoamerica.This book hadthan a little in common with 1434 by Gavin Menzies the book about the Chinese discovering America in fact, the author interviews Gavin Menzies late in the book and does sympathize with his theories However, the author stops short of proclaiming that it is the irrefutable truth that the Chinese discovered America He lays out many of the arguments and evidence, but he does seem to point that it all seems a little inconclusive, naming himself among the lunatic fringe of the academic community Still, his approach made me muchopen to the theory than simply proclaiming that it s all true and that future research will prove him right Menzies book.The early portion of the book in Afghanistan and Pakistan is probably the best He s traveling amongst a new culture, and he is very unsure of himself and his prospects for success He does his due diligence as a journalist, speaking to a number of different people inside Afghanistan to get a broader view of the situation there just before 9 11 although, he does say he did not push himself hard enough, which I found to be a wonderful kernel of truth As he travels to China, I think he s less interested in the people and the culture, since he has already traveled extensively through the country Also, the interludes from Huishen are somewhat jarring and mysterious, and maybe a little pretentious Written by the author during dream like or feverish states, I suppose they are supposed to reveal some truth about the author and his journey, but, portraying them solely as missives from the monk itself seem to force the book out onto that lunatic fringe a little further THis book did not in my opinion live up to its potential I was looking forward to the story of tracing the route of a 5th century Bhuddist monk from Afghanistan to the AMericas There was very little about the monk 0 due in part to the fact that there is very little written about him, but even the travelogue was disappointing since the author never really got to see many of the archaeological things he wanted to see because he always arrived somewhere after things were closed or there was a hol THis book did not in my opinion live up to its potential I was looking forward to the story of tracing the route of a 5th century Bhuddist monk from Afghanistan to the AMericas There was very little about the monk 0 due in part to the fact that there is very little written about him, but even the travelogue was disappointing since the author never really got to see many of the archaeological things he wanted to see because he always arrived somewhere after things were closed or there was a holiday or the person he wanted to see was away Having read a similar book about a Christian monk who starts out from Iceland and ends up in Constantinople, which had muchdetail about the monks journeys, I was disappointed in this one From war torn Afghanistan, through the snow capped Himalayas and across the burning sands of the Taklamakan desert, to a rapidly modernizing China and on to the Central American jungles it seems an impossible journey, but one that Gary Geddes eagerly undertook in order to retrace the voyage of the legendary th century Buddhist monk Huishen Geddes was long fascinated with stories of Huishen s life and travels this Afghan holy man fled Kabul for China and may have crossed the Pacific to North America , years before Columbus The length and breadth of this expedition, and its difficulty, would have been amazing enough on its own, but Geddes s trip takes on an added dimension and poignancy due to its timing he reaches Afghanistan one month before September ,and arrives in China as the tragic events unfold Along the way, Geddes encounters Afghan refugees, Pakistani dissidents, Tibetan monks, Buddhist scholars, a KFC outlet in Luoyang, mysterious cairns in Haida Gwaii, and ghostly remains in Mexico As the Silk Road morphs into superhighways, ancient sculptures turn into military targets, Geddes glimpses, in the collision of past and present history, important clues for imagining a workable future ✫ Fisica 1 - Principios y Problemas Books ✭ Author Paul W. Zitzewitz – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk through the snow capped Himalayas and across the burning sands of the Taklamakan desert [BOOKS] ✬ The Beautiful Disruption By G.G. Renee Hill – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk to a rapidly modernizing China and on to the Central American jungles it seems an impossible journey ➸ [Read] ➳ Games Rednecks Play By Jeff Foxworthy ➽ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk but one that Gary Geddes eagerly undertook in order to retrace the voyage of the legendary th century Buddhist monk Huishen Geddes was long fascinated with stories of Huishen s life and travels this Afghan holy man fled Kabul for China and may have crossed the Pacific to North America [PDF / Epub] ☁ The Magic Cottage By James Herbert – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk years before Columbus The length and breadth of this expedition [PDF] ✪ Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby: An Agile Primer (Addison-Wesley Professional Ruby Series) 1, Sandi Metz, eBook - Amazon.com Par Sandi Metz – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk and its difficulty ☁ [PDF / Epub] ☀ Eski Yunanca - Türkçe Sözlük By Güler Çelgin ✎ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk would have been amazing enough on its own ➝ [Epub] ❦ Dont Leave Me Alone By GG ➧ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk but Geddes s trip takes on an added dimension and poignancy due to its timing he reaches Afghanistan one month before September ,and arrives in China as the tragic events unfold Along the way [Reading] ➵ I Won a Spaceship ➼ Harrison Park – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Geddes encounters Afghan refugees [Epub] ➛ The Black Mask Boys By William F. Nolan – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Pakistani dissidents ✷ [BOOKS] ✫ Born to Ride (Sons of Chaos MC, By Eva Grace ❁ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Tibetan monks ❰Download❯ ➽ Evangelical Hermeneutics And The New Testament Use Of The Old Testament Author Rynold D Dean – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Buddhist scholars ❰Download❯ ➾ May and Amy Author Josceline Dimbleby – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk a KFC outlet in Luoyang ❀ [EPUB] ✸ The Tale of Miss Berta London By Jihan Latimer ❤ – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk mysterious cairns in Haida Gwaii ❮BOOKS❯ ✫ personality development Author rajiv k mishra – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk and ghostly remains in Mexico As the Silk Road morphs into superhighways [Download] ➵ Interpretations of Calamity from the Viewpoint of Human Ecology By Kenneth Hewitt – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk ancient sculptures turn into military targets ❰Download❯ ➽ The Hot Flash Club Strikes Again Author Nancy Thayer – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Geddes glimpses ❰PDF / Epub❯ ☃ Angel Landing Author Alice Hoffman – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk in the collision of past and present history [Epub] ➚ Son of Avonar (The Bridge of DArnath, Author Carol Berg – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk important clues for imagining a workable future I thoroughly enjoyed this book and now want to learnabout theories regarding Asian American Precolumbian contacts.I recently finished two books by Peter Hessler about China, and will read his third soonI picked this up to learnabout china and was not disappointed I would definitely recommend this to persons who enjoy nonfiction Having back packed through South America, I could relate to many of his travel experiences Of course there are discomforts and sleepless nights but that ju I thoroughly enjoyed this book and now want to learnabout theories regarding Asian American Precolumbian contacts.I recently finished two books by Peter Hessler about China, and will read his third soonI picked this up to learnabout china and was not disappointed I would definitely recommend this to persons who enjoy nonfiction Having back packed through South America, I could relate to many of his travel experiences Of course there are discomforts and sleepless nights but that just enriches the experience in my opinion Well done, Mr Geddes Thank you for a great read


About the Author: Gary Geddes

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Kingdom of Ten Thousand Things: An Impossible Journey from Kabul to Chiapas book, this is one of the most wanted Gary Geddes author readers around the world.


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