[Epub] ↠ The Children of Jocasta Author Natalie Haynes – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk

The Children of Jocasta This is excellent.You have to know the plays Antigone and Oedipus Rex before reading this, as it is a retelling of those stories from other perspectives, but it is a wonderful book.Heatbreaking and incredibly researched, it paints the events of the two ancient plays and the people surrounding Oedipus in a different light and brings to the fore characters in those plays whose stories were not the focus in the original.As a bit of a classics geek, I really enjoyed this. An exemplary work of art Classics geeks, rejoice For others Oedipus is a character much known by the public conscious with dubious thanks to Freud so do give it a try The novel steadfastly adheres to existing plot points in the associating tragedies of Sophocles and Euripides with a clever nod to the Homeric Odyssey , yet the tale we assume we are familiar with morphs into something entirely spectacular As female characters are blessed with life and agency, and in turn stand out from th An exemplary work of art Classics geeks, rejoice For others Oedipus is a character much known by the public conscious with dubious thanks to Freud so do give it a try The novel steadfastly adheres to existing plot points in the associating tragedies of Sophocles and Euripides with a clever nod to the Homeric Odyssey , yet the tale we assume we are familiar with morphs into something entirely spectacular As female characters are blessed with life and agency, and in turn stand out from their roles in the extant mythos, we readers are given a new tale that may completely subvert your original thoughts of the old Altogether it s a novel and worthwhile read and for me, certainly a wonderful way to start off Christmas Day My Siblings And I Have Grown Up In A Cursed House, Children Of Cursed ParentsJocasta Is Just Fifteen When She Is Told That She Must Marry The King Of Thebes, An Old Man She Has Never Met Her Life Has Never Been Her Own, And Nor Will It Be, Unless She Outlives Her Strange, Absent HusbandIsmene Is The Same Age When She Is Attacked In The Palace She Calls Home Since The Day Of Her Parents Tragic Deaths A Decade Earlier, She Has Always Longed To Feel Safe With The Family She Still Has But With A Single Act Of Violence, All That Is About To ChangeWith The Turn Of These Two Events, A Tragedy Is Set In Motion But Not As You Know ItIn The Children Of Jocasta, Natalie Haynes Takes A Fresh Perspective On An Ancient Story, Reimagining In Gripping Prose How The Oedipus And Antigone Stories Would Look If The Oft Overlooked Female Characters Took Centre Stage Retelling The Myth To Reveal A New Side Of An Ancient Story [Epub] Psiconutrición. Aprende a tener una relación saludable con la comida Por Griselda Herrero Mart n – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Children Of Cursed ParentsJocasta Is Just Fifteen When She Is Told That She Must Marry The King Of Thebes [KINDLE] ❃ Moonsong (The Vampire Diaries: The Hunters, ❆ L.J. Smith – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk An Old Man She Has Never Met Her Life Has Never Been Her Own [PDF / Epub] ⚣ La lanza rota (Leyendas de Kalomaar ✈ Alberto Rojas – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk And Nor Will It Be [PDF] ↠ Im Trying to Love Math Author Bethany Barton – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Unless She Outlives Her Strange [PDF / Epub] ✅ For Every Cat an Angel Author Christine Davis – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Absent HusbandIsmene Is The Same Age When She Is Attacked In The Palace She Calls Home Since The Day Of Her Parents Tragic Deaths A Decade Earlier !!> Epub ➣ Einstein ➢ Author Gabriel Emanuel – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk She Has Always Longed To Feel Safe With The Family She Still Has But With A Single Act Of Violence !!> PDF / Epub ✅ Embryology Coloring Book ❤ Author George Matsumura – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk All That Is About To ChangeWith The Turn Of These Two Events !!> Read ➹ Embriologia ➼ Author George Matsumura – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk A Tragedy Is Set In Motion But Not As You Know ItIn The Children Of Jocasta [[ PDF / Epub ]] ☀ Existentialism and Romantic Love Author Skye Cleary – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Natalie Haynes Takes A Fresh Perspective On An Ancient Story [PDF] ✈ La tentación del fracaso ⚣ Julio Ramón Ribeyro – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Reimagining In Gripping Prose How The Oedipus And Antigone Stories Would Look If The Oft Overlooked Female Characters Took Centre Stage Retelling The Myth To Reveal A New Side Of An Ancient Story No, a retelling of the Oedipus myth without the incest doesn t work And it s unfair to say that it s merely a matter of turning off that part of your brain that disagrees with authorial changes to the myth as it came from Sophocles and Aeschylus and Euripides, as I ve read in another review It sounds condescending, and entirely ignores the fact that, whilst a retold version sure has the right to change all and any elements an author sees fit and the Greek playwrights used to do it, too , it d No, a retelling of the Oedipus myth without the incest doesn t work And it s unfair to say that it s merely a matter of turning off that part of your brain that disagrees with authorial changes to the myth as it came from Sophocles and Aeschylus and Euripides, as I ve read in another review It sounds condescending, and entirely ignores the fact that, whilst a retold version sure has the right to change all and any elements an author sees fit and the Greek playwrights used to do it, too , it doesn t mean all and every change is valid There s one exception to the validity argument the core of a story, the reason why the story is as it is Do tell me, did Euripides, the most rogue of the classics who retold this legend, omit the incest No, he made changes but kept the core, so don t come tell me it s merely that I m not in agreement with Natalie Haynes decision to rescind this core plot point The unwitting incest is the very reason why Oedipus life turned out like it did, the unwitting incest is why Jocasta s life turned out like it did, the unwitting incest is why Antigone and Ismene s lives turned out like they did, the unwitting incest is why all the children of Jocasta lived and died like they did The unfair fate that decreed the downfall of the entire Theban royal family is precisely why the tragic cycle exists in the first place A retelling without the original story s core is NOT a retelling I m seeing that it s readers who are fans of the Sophoclean version the ones unimpressed by Haynes rendition, and I honestly can relate It s not just the above change that s bothered me, because there sthe butchering of sweet and brave Antigone s character to favour her sister Ismene Why is it that you need to take the original heroine down a peg or two to elevate her irrelevant story wise sister I can understand, and do applaud, giving a voice to minor and ignored characters, but not in this fashion And further, I can t see where those who praise the beautiful writing are coming from, because the writing is messy, overly descriptive in parts, and showing the author is too prone to splanining where she shouldn t, too much tell and little show And the structure of the POVs is also messy instead of choosing one style of point of view that would give the whole novel an unified and smooth feel, Haynes inserts TWO different styles third person for Jocasta and first person for Ismene Trying to give each woman an unique and distinguishable voice, perhaps Well, it failed It readlike you strung two different novelettes together and attempted to sell them both as a single novel.It s a real, real pity The author did have some good ideas, like the Sphinx, and it s obvious she wanted to write a realistic and believable novel, one that would readhistorical than mythical, which is something I personally like realistic retellings of myths, that is , but I simply can t get on board with any retake that doesn t respect a story s raison d tre Loved this almost to the end I think it helps to know the Oedipus story, although you can definitely go into this blind and experience the twists and turns, as all is revealed For me, I fell a little out of love about 50 pages from the end The plot took some turns I wasn t entirely on board with and some of the dialogue started to get a bit clunky, or at least I started to notice it After reading Natalie Haynes notes at the back of the book, on why she made particular decisions, I quickly f Loved this almost to the end I think it helps to know the Oedipus story, although you can definitely go into this blind and experience the twists and turns, as all is revealed For me, I fell a little out of love about 50 pages from the end The plot took some turns I wasn t entirely on board with and some of the dialogue started to get a bit clunky, or at least I started to notice it After reading Natalie Haynes notes at the back of the book, on why she made particular decisions, I quickly fell back in love with it and forgot my previous gripes A definite must read for people who like myth retellings This retelling of Oedipus Rex and Antigone centers Jocasta and Ismene as the protagonists, attempting to give both of themof a voice in the story Because I m a professional dilettante and do everything backwards, it is likely I will be rereading Sophocles soon Did you know that Polyneices and Eteocles kill each other It surprised me The beginning of the book was really promising, particularly the opening scene where Ismene is attacked by an unknown assailant view spoiler I thoug This retelling of Oedipus Rex and Antigone centers Jocasta and Ismene as the protagonists, attempting to give both of themof a voice in the story Because I m a professional dilettante and do everything backwards, it is likely I will be rereading Sophocles soon Did you know that Polyneices and Eteocles kill each other It surprised me The beginning of the book was really promising, particularly the opening scene where Ismene is attacked by an unknown assailant view spoiler I thought the author was going to do something really cool and have Ismene actually die Still a good way to open anyway hide spoiler I liked the dual narrative that alternated between Jocasta and Ismene, and the pacing was pretty good both stories were compelling and had similar beats, so I rarely raced through one woman s section to get to the next I also liked that the author tried to center the story in true historical fiction for example, the Sphinx is a roving band of marauders that Oedipus eradicates The issue is that Jocasta still ends up sidelined in her own narrative, and there are several questions that aren t truly resolved view spoiler In the play, Jocasta learns that Oedipus is her son and hangs herself in despair Here, Oedipus s parentage is never really revealed it s just a rumor and Jocasta hangs herself because she s been infected by the plague and doesn t want to pass it on to her children But that entire sequence and thought process is removed from the reader, which is odd because Jocasta is the center of the action up until that point Oedipus sees Jocasta lock herself in her room, and it s only days later that they find out she s actually killed herself at that point, the royal doctor tells everyone that Jocasta had been complaining of plague symptoms hide spoiler Honestly, I think it s really weird to spend an entire book attempting to explain the story from Jocasta s perspective, and then remove it at this crucial moment I also thought the central tension between prophecy and reality was never fully explored or resolved view spoiler In the book, Oedipus isn t even Laius s son he s Jocasta s son with one of Laius s servants, Oran When her baby is originally taken, Jocasta falls into a deep depression and spends the next several years seeking answers from the Oracle and trying to interpret the signs she is given When she marries Oedipus, Jocasta seemingly sloughs off years of belief and decides she no longer puts any stock in signs The narrative tries to support this it s not that Jocasta and Oedipus find out they re related, it s the plague and the ensuing mundane events that cause her death and his blindness but ultimately, the famous Oedipus prophecy does come true He does marry his mother and he does kill the man who is supposedly his father though are we supposed to think that the prophecy is less valid because Laius isn t his father the book doesn t really seem sure hide spoiler It s like the book thinks about tangling with these ideas in a meaningful and nuanced way, but then shrugs at the end and just gives an ending that could have conceivably happened if you accept that it s conceivable that Jocasta and Oedipus find each other and get married at all, of course The Ismene storyline is interesting because Ismene seems to get some of Antigone s traits in order to give her a personality she s the one that buries Eteocles and isn t quite as obedient as Creon would like The problems with the Jocasta storyline overshadow any successes in the Ismene storyline, though, and it is odd that the author chooses to call Jocasta s children by nicknames Antigone is Ani, Eteocles is Eteo, and so on all throughout the book Anyway, it s hard to recommend this to anyone except for the most diehard Sophocles fan If you want good historical fiction set in this period, stick to Mary Renault Everyone who knows me even a little bit will probably know that I am the biggest imaginable fan of the Oedipus and Antigone myths and Ismene, Antigone s overlooked sister, has long been one of my favourite figures in Greek Mythology So imagine how excited I was to spot this book on a display it felt like the book I d always needed in my life.Perhaps that s why this book didn t actually make a massive impression on me I m so attached to the myths and my own interpretations of them, that the Everyone who knows me even a little bit will probably know that I am the biggest imaginable fan of the Oedipus and Antigone myths and Ismene, Antigone s overlooked sister, has long been one of my favourite figures in Greek Mythology So imagine how excited I was to spot this book on a display it felt like the book I d always needed in my life.Perhaps that s why this book didn t actually make a massive impression on me I m so attached to the myths and my own interpretations of them, that the changes Natalie Haynes made often struck me as wrong and unnecessary Of course, Haynes acknowledges in an afterword that her interpretation of the myths often plays fast and loose with the source material, as myth itself so often does I can t fault a book about Greek mythology for transforming the plot and characters for its own purposes But I didn t like a lot of them, mostly for personal reasons that don t really have that much bearing on whether the book was good or bad for example, I ve always imagined Ismene to be the older sister of Antigone.Some things I really enjoyed about the book the character of Jocasta Haynes does a great job of adding complexity to an already intriguing figure Jocasta s experiences and her reactions feel very realistic, and her relationship with Oedipus is by turns intoxicating and worrying in its intensity Oedipus is depicted as a disarming, hot headed youngster who sweeps into Jocasta s life at a crucial turning point He is sometimes lovable, sometimes frustrating I liked the additional of Sophon, the children s tutor, though I thought it was a little bit bizarre to split the seer Tiresias into two characters Teresa, the antagonistic housekeeper telling a truth that might just be lies, and Sophon, the benevolent, wise old man Just having Tiresias appear as himself in all his eccentric wisdom might have beeninteresting, especially since the truths and falsehoods behind polytheistic Greek religion come under a lot of scrutiny in the book wouldn t having a central religious figure there, who is making correct points even as his religion is called into question, be an interesting addition The book was very readable and I did enjoy it, though I didn t love it.However, I will comment on some decisions Haynes made that I do think had a bearing on the overall quality of the story view spoiler The absence of the civil war between Eteocles and Polynices, Antigone and Ismene s older brothers, was particularly noticeable for me I spent a good half of the book gearing up for the moment war would break out but it never did, and it felt like the plot was lacking for it Sure, there was an awful lot of content to contend with regardless, but the civil war is a key part of what makes Creon s autocratic grip on power so tenuous and to his mind so necessary Without it, he lacks the depth and nuance of the Sophoclean Creon, who is still grievously wrong, but understandable and even sympathetic Here, he s just a power hungry usurper hide spoiler Another thing I found perplexing and a bit infuriating was the characterisation of Antigone, particularly at the very beginning of the book From the very first moment Ismene s POV describes her as ridiculing Ismene for running around like a barbarian , I had to pause and flip back a few pages, sure that I d missed something and it was actually Antigone s POV, talking about Ismene It made me think of Euripides Phoenician Women, where Antigone drags her tutor up onto the roof of the palace just to see what s going on, while he worries about propriety And the very first scene of Sophocles Antigone has her racing out in public to tell Ismene of the edict Creon has issued Though I definitely felt that her characterisation made a lotsense towards the end, I felt like several of her qualities and her actions were unfairly transposed to Ismene Ismene is a fascinating figure from the Sophoclean Antigone precisely because she is initially practical, erring on the side of human caution, wanting to preserve what remains of her family and not risk her life to help the dead view spoiler When it becomes clear that her sister has acted and been caught anyway, she loses hope and begs to join her sister in death, only to be cruelly rebuffed by Antigone hide spoiler She doesn t need to become Antigone to be a character equally as engaging and almost as iconic.This is a good book if you re easily able to switch off the part of your brain that alerts you whenever a change to the myth is made that you don t personally agree with I d recommend it to anyone who has an interest in the Oedipus and Antigone myths, if only because you ll probably feel as excited as I did by the concept of new material about these stories If you don t know the myth very well, it ll probably also be a pretty good read, although I d highly recommend reading at least the Antigone, if not all of Sophocles surviving Theban plays Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone They re short, blisteringly good, and intensely moving and shocking even if you already know the most famous twists I love classical retellings and read a fair few of them Quite possibly this has made me unduly picky, as I wasn t particularly enthralled by this one The Children of Jocasta retells the story of Oedipus and his unfortunate children via the points of view of Jocasta and Ismene This is a fascinating concept, and parts of it worked really well In general, Jocasta s narrative was compelling and her voice distinctive Ismeme s first person account did not have the same power Perhaps because th I love classical retellings and read a fair few of them Quite possibly this has made me unduly picky, as I wasn t particularly enthralled by this one The Children of Jocasta retells the story of Oedipus and his unfortunate children via the points of view of Jocasta and Ismene This is a fascinating concept, and parts of it worked really well In general, Jocasta s narrative was compelling and her voice distinctive Ismeme s first person account did not have the same power Perhaps because the focus on Ismene left Antigone as a peculiar figure whose actions did not make a lot of sense view spoiler At first Ismene depicts her as only interested in her relationship with Haem, then as power mad enough to stage her own pseudo suicide I didn t like the extent to which Ismene considered Antigone self involved when she, Ismene, was if anythingso The two have moments of solidarity, but they are disappointingly fleeting Honestly, I loved Antigone in Sophocles play when I studied it, so felt she wasn t done justice here Jocasta s motivation to save her children from the plague was fareffective and made for a clever twist on the tragic finale of Oedipus Tyrannos hide spoiler While such interpretations are perfectly valid, even if I largely prefer those of Sophocles, I also found the writing style slightly awkward When describing a setting so distant in time, it s obviously a challenge to evoke very different past with conviction while remaining comprehensible to the lay reader Haynes has a tendency to interject explanations of rituals, objects, and words, which interrupts the narrative flow rather On the other hand, there are also moments when the characters sounded jarringly modern, such as the scene in which the term gentlemen was bandied around I m no classicist and haven t formally studied Greek tragedy since I was 18, but the fact is that other novels have handled these same issueselegantly and unobtrusively I very much liked Jocasta s point of view and found the pacing really good However, The Children of Jocasta is not a patch on two of the best novels I read in 2018 Country, a retelling of the Iliad, and Circe, the story of the demigoddess who features in the Odyssey I also preferred Haynes excellent contemporary novel, The Amber Fury I just didn t enjoy this one, but like another reviewer has said, it wasn t due to poor writing on Haynes part,poor storytelling From a linguistic point of view, Haynes writes well The vocabulary she draws upon is clearly broad, and the writing style is mature By that I mean it has sophisticated construction, as opposed to the narrower vocabulary and simpler sentence construction of books aimed at younger readers Haynes writing does lack a certain imagination and creative flair when I just didn t enjoy this one, but like another reviewer has said, it wasn t due to poor writing on Haynes part,poor storytelling From a linguistic point of view, Haynes writes well The vocabulary she draws upon is clearly broad, and the writing style is mature By that I mean it has sophisticated construction, as opposed to the narrower vocabulary and simpler sentence construction of books aimed at younger readers Haynes writing does lack a certain imagination and creative flair when it comes to imagery, but all in all it is complex, competent, and carefully considered.It was the aspects of authorial choice in the storytelling that turned me off this one For example, though it may initially seem like a small point, I found it irritating that Haynes chose to call Jocasta s children Eteokles, Polyneikes, Antigone, and Ismene Eteo, Polyn, Ani, and Isy I recoiled every time I came across it and that was a lot I can maybe understand an author doing this when writing a historical novel where characters share the same first name, but none do in this story I didn t like the nicknames because they were so incredibly modern, I was jarred right out of the story every time they came up That wasn t helped when, in the early chapters of the book, we find a teenaged Jocasta arguing with her parents about her arranged marriage to an old man It felt out of place and deeply anachronistic Marrying for love is the dominant model in the modern world, but in the ancient world that was far from the case Young girls in the bronze age Near East could expect to be married off at a young age, and for the match to be arranged by her father or other leading male relative , with advancing her family and making a match for security being the primary concerns in the deal And no, I m not saying that no bronze age girl in this position ever once raised a protest, just that it wouldn t have come as a huge surprise, and combined with other elements in the story I began to get a sense of anachronism that permeated my reading experience.Probably the biggest disappointment for me was how Haynes changes the Oedipus myth I ve read and enjoyed plenty of reimaginings which aimed to remove all the fantastical elements and try to construct a plausible historical telling of the tale Haynes book also aims for ahistorical version But she also cuts certain non fantastical elements from the myth that would seem to me to be crucial to the story of Oedipus and Jocasta For example, view spoiler Oedipus here is not caught in a terrible incestuous union with Jocasta, realised only after the fact hide spoiler That story element is absolutely integral to the tale, such that I m not sure it can even be called Oedipus without it Haynes cut out the essence of the story, and what she replaced it with was a much less interesting, insular family drama, on a much smaller scale view spoiler The civil war between Eteokles and Polyneikes just isn t as gripping when it s a shouting match between the two men hide spoiler And, despite all her efforts to put the women of the story front and centre, Jocasta and Ismene still felt like side characters especially Ismene, who didn t feel anyenthralling for the author having taken some of Antigone s key traits and having them awarded to her instead Finally, I simply didn t relish the voice of the audiobook, Kristin Atherton Her female characters were all high pitched and girlish, though at least they conveyed emotion, and her men a low monotone that sucked any and all personality out of them Every male character in this book came across to me as blandly forgettable, indistinguishable from one another.4 out of 10 In The Children of Jocasta, Natalie Haynes expertly brings to life the overlooked females in two well known Ancient Greek tragedies Oedipus and Antigone.We follow Jocasta Oedipus and Ismene Antigone in alternating chapters as Haynes weaves a wonderfully immersive and emotive story stripped of magic and focusses on rationalising these myths Now while I admit that I knew the vague outline of the Oedipus tragedy very, very vaguely I certainly didn t know who Jocasta was before reading, I In The Children of Jocasta, Natalie Haynes expertly brings to life the overlooked females in two well known Ancient Greek tragedies Oedipus and Antigone.We follow Jocasta Oedipus and Ismene Antigone in alternating chapters as Haynes weaves a wonderfully immersive and emotive story stripped of magic and focusses on rationalising these myths Now while I admit that I knew the vague outline of the Oedipus tragedy very, very vaguely I certainly didn t know who Jocasta was before reading, I knew nothing at all of Antigone, the only recognisable aspect to me being the name, and I don t think I was at a disadvantage It took me a few chapters to link the two women and I enjoyed discovering that for myself However, that s not to say those familiar with the plots will find nothing new here By giving these two women their voices we view thewell known characters and scenes in a different light and offers alternative explanations.Earlier I said that Haynes rationalises these stories, and in many ways she does For example the riddling Sphinx becomes a group of bandits patrolling the mountains outside Thebes high walls By doing this the focus is on the events and how they impact Jocasta and Ismene It lends a sense of authenticity to the story that is very effective in whisking the reader away to another time and place I find it easier to relate to characters in situations that I can place myself in rather than in a fantastical world where you lose the sense of reality and thus feel a distance from the characters Although I can never go back in time, the pleasure is in the details as Haynes wonderful descriptions meant that I could picture the scenes perfectly I could feel the blistering heat of the Theban summers as well as the cool relief from dipping feet into fountains Pure escapism, especially in late winter The writing is truly immersive, not only did the wonderful settings jump from the page but also the emotions and relationships between the characters It s not a long book and does follow two separate storylines told decades apart yet the way she paces and weaves the character interactions means the reader really gets to know them and feel their pain Some parts, notably towards the end, are desperately, desperately sad, although I do admit that perhaps I felt the twistsfrom not knowing the story beforehand.I really didn t want to put this down and I am keeping my fingers crossed the Natalie Haynes brings out another retelling soon

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