[Reading] ➷ Horses Don't Fly: The Memoir of the Cowboy Who Became a World War I Ace By Frederick Libby – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk

Horses Don't Fly: The Memoir of the Cowboy Who Became a World War I Ace When Frederick Libby wrote about his early life and exploits, I assumed it would be another memoir self designed to project his image in the best possible light It became apparent early on that such is not the case In his own unvarnished words, he paints an honest and occasionally uncomplimentary picture of his early life in Western territories of the United States at the turn of the century It is the tale of a lust for life that leads him through a series of cowboy adventures and misadventu When Frederick Libby wrote about his early life and exploits, I assumed it would be another memoir self designed to project his image in the best possible light It became apparent early on that such is not the case In his own unvarnished words, he paints an honest and occasionally uncomplimentary picture of his early life in Western territories of the United States at the turn of the century It is the tale of a lust for life that leads him through a series of cowboy adventures and misadventures , culminating in a chance opportunity to join the Canadian Service as a truck driver, even though he d never driven a mechanized vehicle in his life After arriving in France, his unit will never be called to drive into combat, but a long rainy season leaves him spoiling for something else to do He notices a posting on a bulletin board for volunteers to become aerial observers He volunteers, and so starts the second half of his memoir With the same self effacing tone that has become as comfortable chatting with your own grandfather he traces his way through his experiences in the air, the horror of war in the trenches, and his unsettling experiences with the American military after America joins the war effort.I wish I d found this book in time to share it with my father He would have enjoyed it at least as much as I did Great Story Onepeople should read Very well written with many humorous and interesting anecdotes Feels authentic without being pretentious or braggadocios It follows the author from growing up as a cowboy in the American Old West to being one of the first American pilots in WWI Interesting to note the differences between the British and the Americans on so many different levels It was enough to make me wish I was born in time to fly in WWI With the Brits.Make no mistake, the WWI Ai Great Story Onepeople should read Very well written with many humorous and interesting anecdotes Feels authentic without being pretentious or braggadocios It follows the author from growing up as a cowboy in the American Old West to being one of the first American pilots in WWI Interesting to note the differences between the British and the Americans on so many different levels It was enough to make me wish I was born in time to fly in WWI With the Brits.Make no mistake, the WWI Air War was tough and the author talks about coming home to empty chairs round empty tables after some missions where there were few survivors So far my favorite flying memoir from WWI I d love to see this one on the Chief of Staff of the Air Force s reading list Reading Horses Don t Fly reminded me of listening to a grandfather or perhaps a favorite uncle sharing his stories, weaving you in I was around the next generation of flyers growing up, but I was also around a few of those whom my father looked up to Not enough, but then when two orof the old school pilots are gathered, the stories they ll tell Libby lived a fascinating life, but he is so humble and real in this memoir, partly because it is so raw in its writing Don t let that put yo Reading Horses Don t Fly reminded me of listening to a grandfather or perhaps a favorite uncle sharing his stories, weaving you in I was around the next generation of flyers growing up, but I was also around a few of those whom my father looked up to Not enough, but then when two orof the old school pilots are gathered, the stories they ll tell Libby lived a fascinating life, but he is so humble and real in this memoir, partly because it is so raw in its writing Don t let that put you off, though It s likely I would not have come across this book without reading the review posted by Jim, whose review caught my eye, and to whom I owe my thanks If you haven t done so already, hopefully this link will get you there I loved this book from beginning to end the only part I disliked was that it had to have an end I closed the final pages wanting My enjoyment with World War I memoirs attracted me to this book followed by the very eye catching title Horses Don t Fly Born in 1892 Frederick Libby penned his memoir in 1961, which remained unpublished until 2000 I was further drawn by the fact that during WWI this individual served with the Canadian military, the British Forces as well as the American Expeditionary Forces As a rugged individual Libby sought and found adventure and throughout this documented life story, his hilarious sens My enjoyment with World War I memoirs attracted me to this book followed by the very eye catching title Horses Don t Fly Born in 1892 Frederick Libby penned his memoir in 1961, which remained unpublished until 2000 I was further drawn by the fact that during WWI this individual served with the Canadian military, the British Forces as well as the American Expeditionary Forces As a rugged individual Libby sought and found adventure and throughout this documented life story, his hilarious sense of humor shines through The 2000 introduction was provided by Winston Groom, author of Forrest Gump.Libby was young when his mother passed away, which left his father to raise him on their rural Colorado ranch During school afternoons Libby donned chaps and spurs along with a rope garnering a reputation for breaking wild horses The first third of the book captures the atmosphere of a classic Zane Grey or Louis L Amour western novel, yet this is 100% non fiction True to Libby s comical nature his first pony was called Slowpoke Thereafter Libby had first choice from the multitude within his craft As a true cowboy he bonded with his personal horses and he would never part with them for any price For a brief period he departed from his lifestyle to live with his aunt in Marshfield, Mass where he continued his high school education and in his spare time indulged in coastal activities including digging a few clams Upon return to Colorado his horse trade continued to provide both income and friendship contacts throughout other western states.As a dreamer he had visions of traveling away to Tahiti, however once south of the boarder in Mexico he soon found himself north in Canada The Great War, which began in 1914 showed the rippling effects of becoming a world war Libby, physically fit in his early 20 s was overcome by curiosity, which propelled him to join the Canadian military destined for Europe and a jaunt further from home Once committed Libby was informed that the unfortunate hitch was that he had to relinquish is American citizenship The war atmosphere was certainly not Tahiti Libby tired of inclement weather and rain was enlightened by an opportunity to join the British Royal Flying Corps, as through his unique thought process he figured fighter planes only fly in sunny weather His excitement is diminished when he realizes that he is being drawn further intoharrowing combat action Libby becomes an officer and actively serves with other RFC heroes including Capt Albert Ball credited with 47 victories In 1916 Libby had the honor to be issued to Buckingham Palace to be awarded the Military Cross by King George V The following spring he placed an American flag off the back of his English plane as a streamer to let the Germans know there was an American in the air too When America entered the war the Signal Corps had an immediate need for U.S aviators During the fall of 1917 Col William Billy Mitchell and Ambassador Page requested that Libby meet with officials in Washington, D.C to regain his American citizenship and join cause with the U.S aviators While pondering his decision he notedwhich to say the least is away from Washington where a politician will give you anything the hen laid, except the egg These politicians are worse than a pimp A pimp only takes a gal s dough These boys will take everybody s dough They damn near own our countryThe choice to part with his close comrades from the RAF was not easy, but he transitioned to wearing the American officer s uniform.Throughout the lighter reflections within the book a first person historical account has the power fully portray reality Libby mentionedThose who survive will live in a world of their own, isolated in thought from families and others to whom they seem unreal The few infantrymen who survive the trenches will not be able to talk to anyone other than their own kind They will always think and remember things no one believes who wasn t weren t thereFor 27 years I was very close to a man who fit that description I just finished this and it will become one of my most recommended Fred Libby led a life that is no longer possible in a modern society, he will make you wish could Fascinating life told with great humor and humility. what a great book, that could have been overlooked I picked this up because of an old interest in everything to do with airplanes Fred Libby grew up as a rough and tumble cowboy, joined the Canadian Army, went to France in WW I, transfered to the RFC and has a multitude of funny and sad stories about his life This is the type of guy you could sit and have a beer with and just listen to his great stories Highly recommended This is a memoir of a man who lived life and left nothing on the table He grew up in that time of US history that saw rapid changes to how life was lived, from the introduction of electricity to rise of use of the automobile as a primary means of transportation He grew up learning how to break horses, and then made his way on his own working various jobs Eventually he found himself in Calgary when WWI broke out, and joined up with the Canadian Army as a truck driver, even though he had never This is a memoir of a man who lived life and left nothing on the table He grew up in that time of US history that saw rapid changes to how life was lived, from the introduction of electricity to rise of use of the automobile as a primary means of transportation He grew up learning how to break horses, and then made his way on his own working various jobs Eventually he found himself in Calgary when WWI broke out, and joined up with the Canadian Army as a truck driver, even though he had never driven an automobile in his life Once over in France, he answered the call to be an observer in the Royal Flying Corp, the predecessor to the modern RAF He excelled in that role, eventually was a recipient of the Military Cross He flew many sorties over enemy lines both as an observer, and then as a pilot.The writing was narrative in nature, but to the point and didn t dwell on unnecessary details There were many stories that were quite humorous roping an antelope at around age 8 and the lessons learned from that as well as interesting from a historical point of view how he improved on the Lewis guns that the observers used An interesting man during an interesting time of history I really enjoyed this The language seems a little old fashioned, but parts were absolutely hilarious The author was born in 1892, in Sterling, Platte Valley in Colorado His mother died when he was 4 of consumption, so his father was always worried that he might come down with it But, he turned out to be rather healthy and hardy He was the youngest his brother was 12 years older and his sister 13 years older His father sent his sister to live with relatives after his mother died, but he hi I really enjoyed this The language seems a little old fashioned, but parts were absolutely hilarious The author was born in 1892, in Sterling, Platte Valley in Colorado His mother died when he was 4 of consumption, so his father was always worried that he might come down with it But, he turned out to be rather healthy and hardy He was the youngest his brother was 12 years older and his sister 13 years older His father sent his sister to live with relatives after his mother died, but he hired someone to come and cook, etc for the 3 of them He turned down all offers of relatives who wanted to take the young boy and raise him His brother Bud told him his problem was he was too impatient, but he was always getting into unbelievable scrapes generally from not thinking things through , but he managed to survive and come out ahead He usually remarked to himself when he screwed up when will I learn At 6 when he started school, his father gave him a pony to ride to school About 2 years later, Bud parted him from the pony, said he was too big for it and gave him a couple of Indian ponies to break and train He grew up believing in training and breaking with kindness unlike several of his friends He went on to break his own wild horses, always keeping the first he ever broke as a special pet, a palomino he named Pal He had quite a few offers, but refused to be parted from him and when he began to travel, left Pal in his brother s care because he knew Bud would never sell him but would keep and take care of Pal He survived the terrible blizzard that lasted 3 months and wiped out thousands of cattle by himself in a sod hut with his 3 horses in a nearby sod stable He was supposed to look out for the cattle who normally wintered with no problems, but this year was an exception Fortunately, he had enough supplies for himself and his horses, the cattle were supposed to winter off the range, but he saw no one for months until the blizzard ended and there was a thaw.He decided he would go to Tahiti because there was a magazine at the hut with pictures of Tahiti it was nice and warm there But somehow, with the friends he kept running into, he made it to Arizona and then ended up in Canada where he was when WWI broke out He joined up with the Canadian army as a truck driver After all, the war was supposed to be over before he got there and he would get some money and a free trip After he reached France with the truck driving squad he saw a notice on the bulletin board for observers for the RFC and decided to get out of the rain At least, observers didn t fly when it rained So he earned his observer wings and got his training in combat and came up with the idea for a buttstock for the machine gun the observers were using on the F.E.2bs that they flew This would give better balance and handling to the observer So, his pilot thought it was a good idea, and the Major over the squad thought it was a good idea, and the crew chief made one which soon everyone wanted because it worked so much better for the conditions.He made pilot and ace with 14 kills as a pilot and 10 as an observer Then, Billy Mitchell asked for several of the Americans to return to the US to help train US pilots which was a total loss as there was great resistance in the US armed forces to the idea of a flying corps, they called it signal corps.An informative book, told in a light amusing style It was quite fun to read and most of his adventures are told him a tone of voice where he does not aggrandize himself or boast More often he wonders how he survived.I highly recommend this When I was a lad I used to love being in the presence of men like Libby There were a lot of them around in the fifties, veterans of both global conflicts and Korea lumberjacks, cowboys and farmers who signed up to face whatever seemed to be threatening the empire I even knew a couple of Boer war veterans Without exception, these chaps signed up voluntarily to go over and do their bit They were real men with the bark on, tough in a way that comes only from deprivation and toil Their strengt When I was a lad I used to love being in the presence of men like Libby There were a lot of them around in the fifties, veterans of both global conflicts and Korea lumberjacks, cowboys and farmers who signed up to face whatever seemed to be threatening the empire I even knew a couple of Boer war veterans Without exception, these chaps signed up voluntarily to go over and do their bit They were real men with the bark on, tough in a way that comes only from deprivation and toil Their strength came from hard work, and most would be disdainful of the perfumed poofery and posturing of a modern gym I loved their stories and I m afraid I could be a bit of a nuisance in trying to coaxtales out of them.Libby was one of these hard men He started life as a cowboy in Colorado, and broke tough broncs for top pay, often working alone many miles from the closest neighbor When he had companions, they would often be fellows who had it in their best interest to avoid towns or any other place that employed a lawman He cared little for cash and was easily separated from it by folly or friendship These were the days when friendship was a tangible thing and a fellow could spend from his friends wallets as freely as he could from his own Libby ultimately decided to cast his loop further afield He found himself in Canada and was promptly swindled out of his stake by an American, I hasten to state , which was one of the contributing factors to joining a transport battalion in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, in spite of the fact that he had never driven anything that didn t have a horse hitched to it Libby, in effect, declared war on Germany several years before the rest of his homeland.Once overseas, our hero found himself manning a machine gun as an observer in the Royal Flying Corps He would eventually become a pilot and rise to the rank of Captain He was one of the first Americans in action, preceding the exploits of the Lafayette Squadron Without ruining the book by going into too much detail, I can tell you that this amazing man actually served in the military forces of three sovereign states during the same conflict His exploits could fill several volumes with no requirement for fluff or filler.This book might not be a great work technically Libby has a homey style and uses an awkward sentence structure that can be mildly annoying after a while, but he gets full marks for telling a whopping good tale My biggest beef is that the book could easily have been a little thicker I would have loved to have coaxed a coupletales from the good Captain We owe it to these men to read their memoirsthey are all gone now and it seems like we re not making anylike them From Breaking Wild Horses In Colorado To Fighting The Red Baron S Squadrons In The Skies Over France, Here In His Own Words Is The True Story Of A Forgotten American Hero The Cowboy Who Became Our First Ace And The First Pilot To Fly The American Colors Over Enemy LinesGrowing Up On A Ranch In Sterling, Colorado, Frederick Libby Mastered The Cowboy Arts Of Ropi [Reading] ➻ Muerte en Hamburgo (Jan Fabel, ➱ Craig Russell – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Here In His Own Words Is The True Story Of A Forgotten American Hero The Cowboy Who Became Our First Ace And The First Pilot To Fly The American Colors Over Enemy LinesGrowing Up On A Ranch In Sterling [Download] ➾ Jazz Age Stories ➹ F. Scott Fitzgerald – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Colorado !!> Read ➸ Much Obliged, Jeeves ➻ Author P.G. Wodehouse – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk Frederick Libby Mastered The Cowboy Arts Of Ropi


About the Author: Frederick Libby

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Horses Don't Fly: The Memoir of the Cowboy Who Became a World War I Ace book, this is one of the most wanted Frederick Libby author readers around the world.


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