Reading ➸ Samurai! Author Saburo Sakai – Ralphslaurensoutlet.co.uk

Samurai! A unique look at the other side I love books like these, that turn your perspectives sideways. A very interesting biography of a WWII Japanese fighter pilot and his experiences during the war He was one of Japan s leading aces.At the outset of the war, the Japanese flew the Zero, a fighter that was superior to US fighters, and Sakai downed many US fighters Later, as the US introduced superior plans, the Japanese new, faster planes came too late.Sakai s heroism and dedication are impressive Reading this book, I m impressed that there are skilled, principled, heroic fighters on both side A very interesting biography of a WWII Japanese fighter pilot and his experiences during the war He was one of Japan s leading aces.At the outset of the war, the Japanese flew the Zero, a fighter that was superior to US fighters, and Sakai downed many US fighters Later, as the US introduced superior plans, the Japanese new, faster planes came too late.Sakai s heroism and dedication are impressive Reading this book, I m impressed that there are skilled, principled, heroic fighters on both sides of a war It s such a tragedy that their skills are used just to attempt to kill one another.The book provides interesting insight into the psychology of a fighter pilot as well as a small but interesting window into Japanese culture Book By For someone who is perpetually intrigued by the combat that took place in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II, it was very interesting to read a book from the perspective of a Japanese fighter ace I had previously read Oba The Last Samurai, but this was an entirely different reading experience for some reason Overall, Saburo Sakai s story is a gripping one He experienced some of the most intense aerial combat of the entire war, from his early days flying in China to the h For someone who is perpetually intrigued by the combat that took place in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II, it was very interesting to read a book from the perspective of a Japanese fighter ace I had previously read Oba The Last Samurai, but this was an entirely different reading experience for some reason Overall, Saburo Sakai s story is a gripping one He experienced some of the most intense aerial combat of the entire war, from his early days flying in China to the hairy combat over Lai and Rabaul to the final days of the war on the Japanese homeland As with many pilot memoirs, the aerial accomplishments of Saburo and his fellow Japanese pilots seem over exaggerated, but this is too be expected Also, the multiple love interests he speaks of throughout the narrative, while adding a human element to the story, seem a bit forced Overall, though, this book is a reflection of the man s life And what life reads like a perfect story Definitely a wonderful supplemental read for anyone interested in the air war over the Pacific or the Pacific War as a whole It helps American readers understand that the enemy had a face This is the autobiography of Japan s greatest ace pilot to survive WWII Saburo Sakai became a hero in his homeland and his account of his place in the Pacific War is even handed and illuminating In the early days of the war, victory seems to come relatively easy to him and the other pilots in his fighter group due to their superior training and the excellence of the Mitsubishi Zero fighter As the war wears on, however, and the United States becomesfully engaged on its Western front, the This is the autobiography of Japan s greatest ace pilot to survive WWII Saburo Sakai became a hero in his homeland and his account of his place in the Pacific War is even handed and illuminating In the early days of the war, victory seems to come relatively easy to him and the other pilots in his fighter group due to their superior training and the excellence of the Mitsubishi Zero fighter As the war wears on, however, and the United States becomesfully engaged on its Western front, the tide turns and the situation becomes increasingly desperate for Sakai and his compatriots, until the inevitable crushing defeat Sakai, along with his co authors Martin Caidin and Fred Saito, presents exciting accounts of air battles and Sakai s harrowing experience piloting his aircraft back to base after sustaining injuries that should have killed him As good as this stuff is, I was glad that the home front wasn t neglected in his narrative In addition to being a great air warrior, he also lived a wonderful love story with his future wife Saburo Sakai gives a no nonsense look behind the curtain of the IJN air corp For those of us who have studied the training techniques the Japanese used on their trainees, there will be little surprise at the brutality they dished out to new recruits No matter how harsh we in the West view these tactics, Saburo constantly goes back to how it saved his lifethan once For some of us it might be hard to enjoy this story when he starts describing his and his wing s accomplishments against th Saburo Sakai gives a no nonsense look behind the curtain of the IJN air corp For those of us who have studied the training techniques the Japanese used on their trainees, there will be little surprise at the brutality they dished out to new recruits No matter how harsh we in the West view these tactics, Saburo constantly goes back to how it saved his lifethan once For some of us it might be hard to enjoy this story when he starts describing his and his wing s accomplishments against the British, Australian, Chinese and American pilots who are being shot down in droves I didn t feel the same animosity when reading about the German fighter pilots who downed scores and scores of fighters and bombers Is it because the Japanese had the surprise attack at Pearl Harbor or the fact we know how barbaric the IJA treated our prisoners of war Perhaps it a combination of the two That aside, it is a good read He will take you through his training, aspirations, dreams, conquests, comradeship and yes, once promoted to an officer, the true news that the war is lost and it s only a matter of time to accept the inevitable Reading his story reminded me of the Calculus II professor I had in college When he realized I was going to be setting the curve for the class, on the low end, he asked, What would you like to discuss Seeing how is ancestry was Japanese, Where you in Japan during the war and what do you remember There recollections of the Battle of Midway were very close Saburo was able to read the transcripts after his promotion while my professor said, we knew when none of the sailors, ships or flyers returned A good solid read with one major problem, like so many books that have been republished and released, this one is packed with unacceptable grammatical mistakes I came up with at least thirty seven Again, unacceptable Four Stars I read alot of these books When I was in High School at Sebeka, MN and when I was in the Army Especially my 1st Tour as a MP in Muenster by Dieberg, Aschafflengberg Darmstadt area.Trying to find and catalog the books I have read in the past.Many I need to re read again. Without a doubt my favourite book about aviation in WW2. There s a lot of air battles in this And not much of anything else I liked Saburo s honesty There s a story where he and an allied pilot are locked in an exhausting dogfight Eventually Saburo gets a couple of shots at the cockpit, glass shatters He pulls up alongside and the badly wounded allied pilot raises his arm in a sort of salute Saburo salutes back, two warriors reaching out across the sky before he falls behind to shoot the crippled plane out of the sky Oh Did he mean to tell There s a lot of air battles in this And not much of anything else I liked Saburo s honesty There s a story where he and an allied pilot are locked in an exhausting dogfight Eventually Saburo gets a couple of shots at the cockpit, glass shatters He pulls up alongside and the badly wounded allied pilot raises his arm in a sort of salute Saburo salutes back, two warriors reaching out across the sky before he falls behind to shoot the crippled plane out of the sky Oh Did he mean to tell us that he watched the crippled plane limp to safety But not so much fun as Kamikaze A Japanese Pilot s Own Spectacular Story of the Famous Suicide Squadrons This was always one of my favorite books as a younger reader I finally met and came to know Saburo Sakai, and he was one of the most entertaining interviews I ever conducted and published This book is 100% true, no embellishment, and if you want to see the mind of a young man who became a national hero, in a war he hated, read this book.


About the Author: Saburo Sakai

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Samurai! book, this is one of the most wanted Saburo Sakai author readers around the world.


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